Wildlife of Galapagos

  • June 30, 2017

    The critically endangered waved albatross of Galapagos »

    This blog was kindly written by Dominic Lewisohn. Dominic has spent this week volunteering for Galapagos Conservation Trust – writing this blog, assisting with the photo competition and helping create a video. Waved albatrosses, endemic to Galapagos, have the largest wingspan of the birds in Galapagos making them one of the most majestic birds to read more

  • April 27, 2017

    Darwin’s Finches »

    Darwin’s finches are a group of fourteen species of finch, thirteen of which are endemic to Galapagos, the other to the Cocos Islands off the coast of Costa Rica. Their name is in reference to British scientist Charles Darwin, who discovered these small birds during the voyage of the Beagle to the Galapagos Islands in read more

  • February 23, 2017

    The most diverse animal across the Archipelago »

    What is the first thing that comes to mind when someone mentions the Galapagos Islands? Marine iguanas, giant tortoises or even the blue-footed booby? You probably weren’t thinking of the snails? Most people wouldn’t as these little creatures are some of the least known terrestrial species in the Galapagos Islands. However the land snail population read more

    Picture of Galapagos Snail by Christine Parent ©
  • May 23, 2016

    The Galapagos food chain: What’s on the menu? »

      Humans have a huge variety of choice when it comes to choosing what food we want to eat. Supermarkets are full of varied food and products from different countries from all over the world. However, in the animal world, the daily diet is often a little bit more limited! Their diet must be based read more

  • May 6, 2016

    Underwater travellers: the Marine Shark Sanctuary »

    It would be a great idea to knock our heads together with their curiously-shaped heads to open our eyes to the vulnerability of scalloped hammerhead sharks and other marine beings that inhabit the ocean around Galapagos.   The population of scalloped hammerhead sharks has suffered significantly, leading to a huge decrease in numbers, mostly due to human impacts. read more